Michigan English Language Assessment Battery (MELAB)

The Michigan English Language Assessment Battery (MELAB) is an intermediate to advanced level standardized examination for adult nonnative speakers of English. The MELAB is recognized by thousands of colleges, universities, and professional organizations as evidence of high intermediate to low advanced English language proficiency, for academic or professional purposes.



MELAB Test




MELAB test
Who is it for?
The MELAB exam is designed for non-native, adult English speakers interested in pursuing higher education opportunities in English speaking countries. As a result, MELAB test is frequently used by university admissions offices to judge whether applicants are equipped to handle the rigors of an English-language, university-level study program.
MELAB test
Why should you take the MELAB exam?
The MELAB exam would also be useful for professionals or anyone else interested in a formal certification of their English language proficiency. Moreover, like the English Language Institute’s other exams, the MELAB test uses the spelling, grammar, and pronunciation conventions of American English and is designed to replicate the level of English a student might encounter in a university setting in the United States. As a result of this focus, many applicants use their MELAB certifications when applying for language schools, job promotions, or when conducting business in the United States. In fact, many educational institutions both in the United States and elsewhere accept the MELAB as an alternative to the more widely-known TOEFL.

Test Format


Section Time Description Number of Items
Writing 30 minutes Test takers write an essay based on one of two topic choices. 1 task
Grammar
Cloze
Vocabulary
Reading
80 minutes Grammar (multiple choice)
An incomplete sentence is followed by a choice of four words or phrases to complete it. Only one choice is grammatically correct.
32
Cloze (multiple choice)
Two passages with deletions are followed by choices of words and phrases to complete the text. Test takers must choose the word or phrase that best fills the blank in terms of grammar and meaning.
24
Vocabulary (multiple choice)
An incomplete sentence is followed by a choice of four words or phrases to complete it. Test takers must choose the option that best completes the sentence in terms of meaning.
31
Reading (multiple choice)
Four reading passages are followed by comprehension questions. Test takers choose the correct answer from the printed answer choices.
23
Listening 35 – 40 minutes Part 1 (multiple choice)
A short recorded question or statement is accompanied by three printed responses. Test takers choose the statement that conveys a reasonable answer or response.
18
Part 2 (multiple choice)
A recorded conversation is accompanied by three printed statements. Test takers choose the statement that means about the same thing as what is heard.
22
Part 3 (multiple choice)
Four recorded interviews, such as those that might be heard on the radio, are each followed by recorded comprehension questions. The questions and answer choices are printed in the test booklet. Test takers choose the correct answer from the choices.
20
Speaking 15 minutes Test takers engage in a conversation with an examiner 1 task